Timeline

1957
Chicago branch of NAACP report "De Facto Segregation in the Chicago Public Schools"
1961
Chatham-Avalon Park Community Council (CAPCC) filed suit to correct racial imbalance in Chicago schools
1962

1963
CCCO staged massive boycott of public schools
1964
Second major boycott of schools organized by CCCO; Bernard LaFayette tapped by the American Friends Service Committee to begin organizing on Chicago's West Side
1965
June
Daily marches against school segregation led by CCCO
July
Martin Luther King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) toured Chicago
August
Watts Riot in Los Angeles
September
SCLC decided to target Chicago for next campaign; SCLC and CCCO formed the Chicago Freedom Movement
Fall
James Bevel, SCLC staffers, and Chicago civil rights activists targeted Chicago's West Side for organizing effort
1966
January

  • Kick-off of the Chicago Freedom Movement
  • Martin Luther King moved into a decrepit flat on Chicago's West Side to spotlight commitment to "End Slums"

February
Operation Breadbasket, the Chicago chapter, headed by Jesse Jackson, organized
May
Deep concern among civil rights leaders that the movement was floundering
June
March in Mississippi in response to shooting of James Meredith; "Black Power" rallying cry shouted
July
Major rally in Soldier Field; Uprising on the West Side; Chicago Freedom Movement leaders decided to target housing discrimination; fair-housing testing and then marches held
August
Fear of racial explosion as whites erupt against fair-housing marchers; negotiations to bring an end to the demonstrations convened; finally, a "Summit Agreement" reached, supported by businessmen, church leaders, Mayor Richard J. Daley and city officials
September
Dissatisfied activists staged demonstration through nearby Cicero
1967
January
Another band of SCLC activists, led by Hosea Williams, sought to organize a get-out-the-vote campaign
May
Leadership Council for Metropolitan Open Communities, a product of the "Summit Agreement" launched "Project: Good Neighbor"; Martin Luther King declared that no more demonstrations were necessary; the Chicago Freedom Movement was over